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Our new Director of Outreach and Recruitment, Ben Welbourn, was lucky enough to experience his own gap year after graduating from high school. In a series of blog posts, Ben will share some of the lessons he learned first-hand from his year exploring the world, uncovering his passions, and living life to its fullest before heading to college. This is the first entry of his series.


High school students receive drastically different messaging than I do as someone in the field of experiential education. They're asked every day what they want to be when they grow up, where they are going two months after they graduate from high school, what they want to study, and what they want to accomplish. Most of the adults who ask that probably don't even know what they want to be, do, or accomplish, so they're asking pretty unfair questions.

My favorite thing about getting out of high school and college is that I now hear a completely different philosophy. My colleagues consistently say that there's no way a high school student should be expected to know what they want to study, let alone what they want to do with their life. My life goal is to make sure high school students receive similar, more supportive messaging.

If you're thinking about taking a gap year, you're probably feeling pretty vulnerable. People probably ask you "why?" Because you have guts, that's why. If something doesn't quite feel right about going straight to college, listen to your gut, and figure out a responsible plan of action. People will understand - even if it's after the fact.

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 Senior year, students at my high school consistently asked me why I wasn't going straight to college, and they asked the question with both curiosity and a palpable tone of confusion. A few weeks into my gap year, I was a couple hundred miles into the Appalachian Trail when a Facebook group popped up: "I wish I was Ben Welbourn." Front and center: a photo of me conquering another mountain. It was created by our class president/football captain/lacrosse captain/resident stud. That was my first positive reinforcement from a peer, and it happened over a year after my decision to defer from college. After that, I got more and more support from high school friends and complete strangers from the college I was yet to attend. Be patient!

A week before graduation, my high school Spanish teacher asked me what my plans were post-high school. When I told her I was about to start a gap year, she told me "Yeah, that's probably a good idea." Initially, I took that as an insult, as if she was telling me, "Yeah, you're a mess, so you're probably not ready for college." I've kept in touch with her long enough to know now that she just saw a gap year as a great opportunity for me to find focus.

Stick to your guns, but put in the leg work to make sure that once you do take your gap year, you'll come out with new skills and experiences that everyone will appreciate.



Deciding to do the uncommon is intimidating, but if you're looking for support right out of the gate, please check out the info session webinar we had last Wednesday, or reach out to Ben at ben@winterline.com.